Applied Superconductivity. Volume II by Vernon L. Newhouse

By Vernon L. Newhouse

Utilized Superconductivity, quantity II, is a part of a two-volume sequence on utilized superconductivity. the 1st quantity handled digital purposes and radiation detection, and incorporates a bankruptcy on liquid helium refrigeration. the current quantity discusses magnets, electromechanical purposes, accelerators, and microwave and rf units.
The booklet opens with a bankruptcy on high-field superconducting magnets, masking purposes and magnet layout. next chapters talk about superconductive equipment resembling superconductive bearings and cars; rf superconducting units; and destiny clients in utilized superconductivity.
Each bankruptcy within the volumes will be learn independently, and so much think little or no or no history within the physics of superconductivity. the subjects handled don't require using complex quantum mechanics; therefore the books could be obtainable to scholars or learn employees in any department of engineering or physics. they're meant to serve either as a resource of reference fabric to latest strategies and as a consultant to destiny study.

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30. Magnetization of a slab as a function of ambient field. The solid-line mag­ netization is based on J0 = const and the dotted-line magnetization on J0 = J0(H). tion is simply the average magnetic induction within the superconductor. Thus for a one-dimensional case such as this slab, it is given by M -τέτΛ"«-^ (95) dx From Fig. 29 and Eq. (95), we can compute Μ(ΗΛ) for the slab: H -M(H&) = ΗΛ -Μ(ΗΛ) = Hc/2 > u s ττ 4ΐΓ τ Η0 < H& < HC2 (96) (97) M(Ha) is plotted in Fig. 30. The dotted curves in Fig.

I W A S A AND D. B . MONTGOMERY For the dipole they are, expressed separately for the r and 0 components, for r < p, Hr = He= 1 dAn r ΘΘ - 21 °° r2n~2 = — Σ -r-7Cos(2n _ l ) ^ s i n ( 2 n - 1)0 2 1 7Γ n=1 p "" θΑ Ό 27 = — Σ -i—: cos(2n - 1)ψ cos(2n - 1)0 dr * «-1 P (38) (39) and for r > p, 2/ « sin(2n - 1)0 2n-l Hr,6 = ± — Σ ^V" C 0 S ( 2 n - ! ) * (40) cos(2n — 1)0 where the upper of the braced terms gives the r component, and the lower term gives the 0 component of the field. Similarly for the quadrupole, they are, for r < p, on-i (cos 2nd] = ^F — Σ ~r~ sin 2n^ * n-l P sin 2w0 2/ ΗΤ,Θ °° γΐη—1 (41) and for r > p, Hr,e = 2 / - P2" .

4314 0. 3602 0. 3090 0. 2405 0. 4640 1. 7670 0. 4576 1. 7016 0. 6646 0. 5922 Qi(K, nC l\) _ - 12. 2562 î (c t - i ) 12. 6832 0. 6758 0. 500 5. 8100 1. 1290 0. 9408 0. 6272 0. 1580 2. 4080 2. 4050 1. 55 K=4 a1 = 10°; a2 = 20°; a3 = 30°; a4 = 40° J2/J1 = 0. 8794; Js/Ji = 0. 9930 0. 8724 9. 0278 0. 5882 9. 2920 0. 1460 9. 5838 0. 4036 0. 58 K j k (sin 2 a k - s i n 2 a k _ 1 ) (c** -4 _ ! ) 1 ( C 1 - l ) ( 2 n - l ) ( 4 n - 4 ) C a 4n-4 ( - 1 ) (Cx Qexl02 (r/aj* (H/Hc)t Ji k = 4n Q5XIO 2 (r/a x )* -fΣ (-1) Qn>l (Κ,η,^) Qn(K, n, Cx) = lnC lnC Qi 38 4 / 7 ° Q7 x 10 2 Q7 x 10 2 Cl Qi (H/Hc)f -D (2n-l)(4n)(C1-l)C4n-1 1 1 Ji Jx K Σ (sin(4n-2)«k-sin(4n - 2 ) « k - l ] k=l K Σ k=l {sin(4n - 2 ) a k - s i n( 4 n - 2 ) a k - l ) *Location of maximum field.

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